Naming Conventions

Because there are so many variations of chord changes & genres, we thought we’d explain the naming convention for how tracks are categorized.

Track Names and Genre Variations

We originally come up with the chord progression for the verse and the chorus of each track. This gets named using our street name strategy (Maxwell Street for example). Once the chord progression is established & named, we then start composing musical style (Genre) variations of the chord progression. This is normally done in the original key for all of the genre variations, and named accordingly.
For example:

  • Maxwell Street – Pop Rock
  • Maxwell Street – Pop Rock Christmas
  • Maxwell Street – 80s Ballad
  • Maxwell Street – 80s Ballad Christmas
  • Maxwell Street – 70s Funk
  • Maxwell Street – 70s Funk Christmas
  • Maxwell Street – 60s Soul
  • Maxwell Street – Solo Piano
  • Maxwell Street – Bluegrass Ragtime
  • Maxwell Street – Bluegrass Stomp
  • Maxwell Street – Boogie
  • Maxwell Street – Acoustic Jazz Trio
  • Maxwell Street – Electric Piano

Tempo and Key Variations

Sometimes you may find the perfect track but it is too fast (or slow), or perhaps a little out of your singing range. To assist with that, we take each genre for every chord progression and create faster/slower and higher/lower pitched versions. *

Combo Set Example:

  • Maxwell Street – Boogie – Original Key & Original Tempo (Named: Maxwell Street Boogie G 165)
  • Maxwell Street – Boogie – Original Key & Faster Tempo (Named: Maxwell Street Boogie G 175)
  • Maxwell Street – Boogie – Original Key & Slower Tempo (Named: Maxwell Street Boogie G 155)
  • Maxwell Street – Boogie – Higher Key & Original Tempo (Named: Maxwell Street Boogie A# 165)
  • Maxwell Street – Boogie – Higher Key & Faster Tempo (Named: Maxwell Street Boogie A# 175)
  • Maxwell Street – Boogie – Higher Key & Slower Tempo (Named: Maxwell Street Boogie A# 155)
  • Maxwell Street – Boogie – Lower Key & Original Tempo (Named: Maxwell Street Boogie D 165)
  • Maxwell Street – Boogie – Lower Key & Higher Tempo (Named: Maxwell Street Boogie D 175)
  • Maxwell Street – Boogie – Lower Key & Slower Tempo (Named: Maxwell Street Boogie D 155)

* This would explain why you might here the same song/genre in your searches, if you listen close they will be higher/lower & faster/slower variations.

Note: Don’t be afraid to check out the other keys & tempos variations of the songs, it is amazing how much the character of a track changes based on the key & tempo. A Ballad will suddenly change in to an Easy Listening track (or vice versa) just by being faster or slower.

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